Situational Report No. 2 | Aceh Earthquake 2016

 

Aceh Earthquake 2016
Situational Report No. 2
12 December 2016

Situational Overview and Preliminary Findings of Geutanyoë Foundation’s Field Assessment in Trienggadeng Subdistrict, Pidie Jaya District, Aceh

On 8 December 2016, Geutanyoe Foundation established a post at the subdistrict government’s (Camat) office in Trienggadeng and is supporting the subdistrict government with data collection and management. Geutanyoe Foundation also began a field assessment in 27 villages in Trienggadeng subdistrict. This Situational Report presents the preliminary findings of our field assessment, as well as some analysis of overall situation.

Latest Official Figures of Human Toll
(22.00 Western Indonesia Time, 11 December 2016)

Dead: 102

Severely injured: 134

Minor injuries: 532

Displaced: 83,838 people in 124 locations

 

HIGHLIGHT

  • The Indonesian Central Government has shown strong leadership and support to the Provincial Government of Aceh for the emergency response.
  • The President announced that the government would provide a compensation package of Rp. 40 million for severely damaged houses and Rp. 20 million for partially damaged houses.
  • While the death toll has not risen significantly since 8 December, the official figure of internally displaced persons (IDPs) rose dramatically to 83,838 people in 124 locations on 11 December
  • A systematic displacement tracking and beneficiary verification system with a common methodology shared among all stakeholders is required in order to credibly monitor displacement, vulnerability, return and sustainable recovery throughout the earthquake recovery process. The government should take the lead in such a system, supported in the field by trained local facilitators who can verify and validate data as well as monitor
  • There is a need for vulnerability and protection assessments, as preliminary assessments among IDPs have revealed certain particularly vulnerable groups, including communities with illness and disabilities, as well as a high number of women and children among IDPs.
  • Aid distribution has been uneven, and although it seems to be improving there are still some communities who have not received aid yet. While there has been good cooperation between government and citizens, there is a notable difference in the distribution of government aid and aid being delivered by private and voluntary citizens groups, with the former being collected by the government’s coordination post and the later being distributed directly to affected communities. There has been some critique by affected communities of slow or even lack of distribution of aid by the government, including complaints from IDPs that they had to come to the coordination post themselves bringing a letter from their village head without support for
  • In Meureudu and surrounding urban areas, markets and shops have started to reopen. However, there has still been very limited market recovery in the rural areas. In Trienggadeng, for example, small warung (food stalls) have reopened but shops that sell rice, cooking oil and other essential food and non-food items remain closed.

 

BACKGROUND

A strong earthquake measuring 6.4 on the Richter Scale struck Aceh province of Indonesia on Wednesday, December 7, 2016, at 05:03:36 A.M. Western Indonesian time (December 6, 2017 at 10:03:36 GMT). Based on information from Indonesian National Meteorology and Geophysical Agency (BMKG), the earthquake epicentre was located on land at coordinates 5.19 ° N and 96.38 ° E, at a depth of 10 km, near Meureudu, the district of Pidie Jaya, situated 106 km southeast of the provincial capital Banda Aceh, or 35.8 Km west of the town of Bireuen, and 51.1 km southeast of Sigli. As a result of the earthquake hundreds of buildings have collapsed, particularly offices, mosques and multi storey shops. Many houses and roads have also sustained severe damage and at least one school has been heavily damaged. Based on reports from multiple government and citizen sources in various sub-districts along the coast it is estimated that the earthquake has affected all coastal areas of Pidie Jaya district, plus several subdistricts of Samalanga in Bireuen district. We estimate the length of devastation zone about 40 km along the east coast of Aceh, from Bandar Baru sub-district in Pidie to Samalanga sub-district in Bireuen.

 

SITUATION OVERVIEW

Humanitarian Conditions

Dead, Missing and Injured
The death toll, now at 102, has not increased significantly since 8    December. On 8 December, BNPB raised the death toll to 102, the number of severely injured to 135 and the number of injured to 589. On 10   December, one more earthquake victim was declared to have passed  away, bringing the toll to 102 people. 1 person has been declared missing

Displacement
Displacement figures, have increased dramatically in the last four days. On 8 December, BNPB published an official figure of internally displaced persons (IDPs) with a total of 11,142. On 10 December, however, the official IDP figure rose twice:  on 10 December (time) BNPB declared that there were 23,231 IDPs. Later that day, it was updated to 45,329 people. On 11 December at 12:00, the figure was raised again to 65,064 people in 94 locations, and later that day, at 22.00 the figure rose again to 83,838 people in 124 locations.

Subdistricts/District Number of IDPs
Meureudu, Pidie Jaya  13965
Meurah Dua, Pidie Jaya  11391
Trienggadeng, Pidie Jaya  18512
Bandar Baru, Pidie Jaya  14209
Pante Raja, Pidie Jaya  8153
Bandar Dua, Pidie Jaya  3170
Ulim, Pidie Jaya  9763
Jangka Buya, Pidie Jaya  2959
Matang Mns. Blang, Bireuen  1100
Mesjid Matang Jareung, Bireuen  13
Mesjid Alghamamah, Bireuen  405
Mesjid Alghamamah, Bireuen  98
Total  83,838

 

The IDPs are scattered across a wide area, many preferring to stay in their house compounds or near their homes as well as with relatives or neighbours, rather than joining larger groups of IDPs more central locations with easier access to aid. It is unclear if current IDP figures include  mobile IDPs who have left the affected districts to stay with relatives in other districts. It is a common practice in Aceh when facing insecurity that families decide to send children and women go away from disaster site while the men and youth choose to stay on site near the home to continue cleaning the debris and rehabilitate their homes.

IDPs situated in the district capital or near the highway acknowledge they have enough food rations right now, while some IDPs in more remote locations or at the periphery of the district report not receiving aid supplies yet. As reported by our Humanitarian Coordinator after interviewing some IDPs near our Trienggadeng subdistrict post, we found that on 9 December, 27 villages still had not received food rations and other aid yet. (Note: By 10 December aid had started to arrive and on 11 December Geutanyoe supported distribution by several aid groups including from a Buddhist temple association.)

While IDP figures will fluctuate in any displacement crisis, there are indications that there is currently significant disparity between the government’s displacement data and that being collected by some humanitarian organisations directly from the village heads (keuchik). This could be partly due to differing understandings of who an IDPs (pengungsi) is. It will, thus, be a priority for all stakeholders to work with and support the government in the establishment of a systematic displacement tracking system and common methodology in order to credibly monitor displacement, return and recovery throughout the earthquake recovery process.

Vulnerability and Protection
There is a need for enhanced attention to the special needs of vulnerable groups and to protection concerns, as preliminary assessments among IDPs have revealed certain particularly vulnerable groups, including communities with illness and disabilities, and a high number of women and children among IDPs. For example, our preliminary data analysis of the affected population reveals 236 pregnant women and 431 lactating mothers in Trienggadeng subdistrict. In addition, on 8 December, the Geutanyoe Foundation assessment team identified a group of 218 IDPs from the leprosy community of Meue village, Trienggadeng subdistrict. The community consists of a high number of women and children. Such groups are particularly vulnerable and will require special attention and protection. In addition, many displacement communities have communicated an urgent need for milk and supplies for babies, pregnant women and lactating mothers. Both IDPs in town and periphery, have expressed a common concern, especially for their babies need for milk, pampers, and soft blankets, as what they received were blankets for adults which are not soft enough for babies’ and toddler’s skin.

Food Security and Market Access
In Meureudu and surrounding urban areas, markets and shops have started to reopen. However, there has still been very limited market recovery in the rural areas. In Trienggadeng, for example, small kiosks and warung (food stalls) have reopened but shops that sell rice, cooking oil and other essential food and non-food items remain closed. IDPs in rural areas have complained about the unavailability of markets open near them, even though they have money to buy daily needs. Only small wooden kiosks that commonly only sell cigarettes, snack and soft drinks are open. The lack of access to markets is especially affecting the special needs of babies and women.

 

Housing and Infrastructure Damage

Based on field observation, the earthquake disaster also looks impacted the certain condition of buildings quality, specially for newer development of multi story shops which use small size of steels and small dimension of columns. Indicated from the case of shop rows in Meureudu (capital of Pidie Jaya district) where only selected in between shops building getting damage and collapse by quake struck. We found its situation are repeated in other locations too.

Below is latest data as published by Pos Komando Utama Tanggap Darurat Bencana Gempabumi Aceh in Meureudu on 11 December  2016.

Damage to Housing
Pidie Jaya:  2,874  severe damaged; 8,393  light damage
Bireuen: 55 severe damage; 94 moderate damage; 171 light damage
Pidie: 63 severe damage; 18 light damage
TOTAL 2,992 severe damage; 94 moderate damage; 8,582 light damage

Damage to Public Buildings
Pidie Jaya: village offices (5), roads (14.800 meter), village bridges (49), government offices (4), shophuses (105), market (1), mosques (57), and prayer houses (87). Damage of education facilities so far have been calculated at kindergartens (87), primary schools (73), junior high schools (17) dan high schools (10).

Pidie: shophouses (4), mosques (1) in Ds. Blang Jeurat, Kec. Tangse, prayer house (1) in Ds. Trieng Cudo Tunong, Kec. Tiro, bridge (1) di Kec. Kembang Tanjong, school (1) in Ds. Trieng Judo Kec. Tiro.

Bireuen : shophouses (45), mosque (6), dayah/pesantren (religious boarding schools) (5), Al-aziziyah campus (1) poultry market (1) fish market (1), musholla (6), rice mill (3), fences (24), village roads (3), subdistrict government office hall (1) schools (12)

 

The Humanitarian Response

The Government’s Emergency Response
In the first five days of the response, the Indonesian Central Government has shown strong leadership and support to the Provincial Government of Aceh for the emergency response. On 9 December, the President of Indonesia visited with three Cabinet Ministers (Home Affairs, Health and Public Works) and vowed support for reconstruction The Head of the National Disaster Management Agency (BNPB), Willem Rampangilei and the Social Minister, Khofifah Indar Parawansa, also visited the earthquake zone ahead of the President’s visit. The President announced during his visit that families of those who had died in the earthquake would be eligible for compensation of Rp. 15 million, while those injured would receive Rp. 5 million. The President also promised that reconstruction would be swift, and announced that the government would provide a stimulus package of Rp, 40 million for severely damaged houses and Rp. 20 million for partially damaged houses.

Search and rescue and evacuation as well as rubble clearance efforts continued into Day 5, with thousands of additional military and police deployed to assist provincial and local authorities. The SAR effort, which was intensified especially from Day 2-4, has been strong and well-coordinated cooperation among stakeholders on SAR efforts, including BNBP/BPBA, the military and police, health personnel, NGOs, local volunteers, local businesses, and affected communities themselves.

In general, the Government of Indonesia has deployed a high number of personnel for the Pidie Jaya disaster response.  The BNPB and BNPD, Indonesian National Army (TNI), Indonesian Police, National Search & Rescue Agency (Basarnas), TAGANA and others have deployed thousands of officers to support the emergency repsonse.

Strengthening its effectiveness response and coordination, BNPB as the gov. leading agency established a national coordination centre for disaster response at the Bupati of Pidie Jaya’s office. Based on previous disaster responses in Aceh so far, the centre will be expected to act as an umbrella and centre for registration, information, and coordination for any government agencies and humanitarian organisations involved in the response. Supporting the overall emergency response, the Ministry of Transportation stated they already have agreements from four airlines and two shipping operators to support any parties needing flights and shipping cargo to send aid to Aceh.

Aid Access, Coordination, Distribution.
An Emergency Response Command Post (Komando Utama Tanggap Darurat) has been established at the office of the Bupati of Pidie Jaya, with the Vice Bupati of Pidie Jaya appointed as the head. Local aid organisations and citizen volunteer groups have been arriving since 8 December bringing much-needed assistance. National Clusters have been activated on Displacement and Protection, Health, Education and Logistics.

The nature of the disaster has resulted in a scattered impact, with casualties, displacement and damages occurring over an area of approximately 40 km along the east coast across 3 districts. The consequence of the scattered impacts of disaster within huge area means poses challenges to the distribution of equipment, aid and humanitarian workers to reach all locations evenly.

Because of these challenges, the delivery of assistance has so far been uneven, with most efforts still struggling to deliver aid to the heavily affected area of Meureudu and other urban areas and much less focus so far in the surrounding rural subdistricts.

While distribution seemed to be improving on Day 5, at the time of writing there were still some communities who were reporting they had not received aid yet and others who reported inadequate assistance. While there has been good cooperation between the government and citizens, there is a notable difference in the distribution of government aid and aid being delivered by private and voluntary citizens groups, with the former being collected by the government’s coordination post and the later being distributed directly to affected communities. There has been some critique by affected communities of slow or even lack of distribution of aid by the government, including complaints from IDPs that they had to come to the coordination post themselves bringing a letter from their village head without support for transport. There were some reports of tensions arising from perceived inequitable distribution of aid and many messages communicated by volunteer groups of IDPs claiming they had not yet received aid, including some located close to the urban centre where most aid is centralised.

There have also so far been few systematic needs assessments being conducted and the majority of lists of needs are being compiled in an ad-hoc manner. A coordinated multi-stakeholder needs assessment will soon be required to ensure that humanitarian assistance is delivered according to need in an equitable manner and that special attention is given to vulnerability. Different groups should also work together with the government to share assessments as well aid distributed to different areas to allow for a common picture of needs, response and gaps.

Geutanyoë Foundation’s Response

On the morning of 8 December Geutanyoë Foundation (GF) set-up a field office located in subdistrict government’s office of Trienggadeng, situated at periphery of Pidie Jaya district (around 15 km from district capital). GF choose this location after conducting a rapid survey that this area (Trienggadeng sub-district) together with 2 other sub–district (Pante Raja and Bandar Baru) still have not received much support.

GF is helping the subdistrict government collect and input data into the government system, facilitating aid distribution to the villages, and will spend the next two weeks conducting assessments, including on emergency needs, displacement, vulnerability, access to services, psychosocial health, food security and livelihoods. GF will also support the villagers of affected communities in TG with access to information and facilitate their direct participation in the recovery process.

***

For further information, please contact:

Hermanto Hasan
Director of Yayasan Geutanyoë
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+62 852-6197-6900 (WA)
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/yayasanGeutanyoë/
Website: http://www.geutanyoe.org/

 

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